2 Notes

botanicality:

Little man was excited to get his orange dino!

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Botanicality

botanicality:

Little man was excited to get his orange dino!

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Botanicality

6 Notes

I live in the south in the US and have started a little collection of aloes and succulents. I want to have them in a garden one day as pretty accents but I'm afraid to put them outside. I almost killed my aloe by leaving it outside in the heat earlier this year. How do yours grow outside as well as they do and what do you do with them in the winter?

Asked by this-is-me-and-mine

kihaku-gato:

biodiverseed:

I grow just one mama aloe and a few pups in a sunny window, and I use it for burns. It’s the easiest thing to have on hand for first aid if you accidentally scald yourself (but don’t eat it — more and more studies show they are toxic)!

As far as I understand (succulents are not my specialty, so you may want to ask someone like cactguy or cacticonnoisseur to get a second opinon) heat shouldn’t be an issue, as this is plant that has been naturalised in deserts around thew world.

It’s possible you killed it with kindness and gave it too much water, or that there was an unseasonably cold night and the plant suffered a shock by having it’s environment shifted too rapidly. Other than that, I should think that if you have a good amount of heat and sun, you shouldn’t have any problems growing aloes outdoors in the summertime. Just harden them off gradually with a few hours outdoors every day for two weeks if you are worried about shock.

It could also be transition of the placement as well as their climate! If my previous readings are not mistaken, in more temperate areas most succulents prefer full sun, but in more tropical regions many succulents actually prefer some shade to handle the heat better, so it would be worth testing if they’d do better in shadier spots outside. Also as you said yourself biodiverseed, plants of any kind that come from indoors should be transitioned from indoors to outdoors slowly to harden them off to the stronger sun and change of environment. Even the toughest succulent can get severe sunburn if brought to hotter and sunnier places too quickly.

A little bit of both here for me: in the spring they can easily get burnt, so I gradually move them to their sunnier summer locations. But, as summer progresses, they need partial shade (some more than others).

18 Notes

Sedum morganianum / donkey tail

Sedum morganianum / donkey tail

6 Notes

Vitex agnus-castus / shadow play

Vitex agnus-castus / shadow play

35 Notes

Echinopsis subdedantum ‘Dominoes’

The bloom is at the critical phase: I’ll know in a few days if it will decide to flower. I also made another discovery: a pup - and it is very furry!

10 Notes

Saturday panorama

One hummingbird was back this morning, the pampas are in full bloom despite being shorter than normal this year, the Mammillaria are covered in fruit, the crepe myrtle is persisting the heat, and all the cacti are still actively growing

Saturday panorama

One hummingbird was back this morning, the pampas are in full bloom despite being shorter than normal this year, the Mammillaria are covered in fruit, the crepe myrtle is persisting the heat, and all the cacti are still actively growing

5 Notes

Hey I saw your post about the multicolored cacti in the white square pots at Walmart, and I was wondering what was up with those? I haven't been able to find anything online about them but I've seen them in a few stores around here

Asked by freakydeakysunshine

It is the second generation of pigmentizing cacti. Last year, they painted succulents and cacti, so the paint would eventually wear off or the cacti would grow out of it. Of course, especially on the succulents, it had to have had an effect on transpiration and CO2 absorption, too.

These ones would probably grow fine, but all the new spines will be normal and you’d have an awkward looking plant.

11 Notes

Obscenely golden pampas plumes are taking over the back portion of the garden.

Obscenely golden pampas plumes are taking over the back portion of the garden.

35 Notes

Mammillaria pringlei / This one has such a striking contrast of spines and blooms, and you can just see the developing hairs around the crown.

Mammillaria pringlei / This one has such a striking contrast of spines and blooms, and you can just see the developing hairs around the crown.

35 Notes

Ferocactus hamatacanthus / last bloom

Ferocactus hamatacanthus / last bloom

19 Notes

Aloe, Gasteria, Gasteraloe, Echeveria  & Haworthia / Aloelandia

Aloe, Gasteria, Gasteraloe, Echeveria & Haworthia / Aloelandia

11 Notes

cactguy selfie / 8.28.14

cactguy selfie / 8.28.14

9 Notes

In one of the recent editions of the Journal of the Mammillaria Society, a member reported recording every bloom and subsequent fruit, or chilito, for an entire year. While (1) I would love to do that and (2) I have no time to accomplish such a task, I can say that this year is turning out to be quite prolific.

In one of the recent editions of the Journal of the Mammillaria Society, a member reported recording every bloom and subsequent fruit, or chilito, for an entire year. While (1) I would love to do that and (2) I have no time to accomplish such a task, I can say that this year is turning out to be quite prolific.

10 Notes

a cactguy with his cacti (Thanks, @dirty-policeman)

a cactguy with his cacti

(Thanks, @dirty-policeman)

16 Notes

Mammillaria chionocephala / Snowy head nipple cactus

Mammillaria chionocephala / Snowy head nipple cactus